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Our Self-Written Obituaries – Saumya Kulshreshtha, Vikaspuri

The 15th death.

[Text by Saumya Kulshreshtha; photo by Savi Garg]

Saumya Kulshreshtha was a confident, but confused soul most of her life. She was at the heart of Delhi’s art and culture scene, and it was poetry which she specifically located her cause in. Writing was second to breathing for her. She is remembered for having been queer enough to maintain a twice-a-day journal entry habit during her early and later years.

Expressions, emotions and stories were the drugs that kept Ms Kulshreshtha going. In people she found stories more powerful than those that oozed out from the quills of famous writers. People were her gravitating point, and that was probably the reason why she kept organizing literary and poetic soirees among the heritage hotspots of the city.

A fan of Manto, Iqbal and Faiz, Ms Kulshreshtha spent the latter half of her life picking literary battles with regressive forces prevalent in the world around her. She loved being with people, but her fiercest two-way relationships were forged only with books. She spent the last days of her life wallowing in the false romance of solitude.

Our Obituaries invites people to write their obituary in 200 words. The idea is to share with the world how you will like to be remembered after you are gone. (May you live a long life, of course!) Please mail me your self-obit at

2 thoughts on “Our Self-Written Obituaries – Saumya Kulshreshtha, Vikaspuri

  1. I don’t like Iqbal very much. I’ve read baang-e dara, baal-e jibreel, armaghaan-e hijaaz etc. He was a master of his craft but I feel that there are bits where he wallows in past glories. But I guess one needs to be familiar with his style and poetry to get a better sense of our subcontinent’s literature and its history.

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